SEFAUtil.exe to Resolve "People I manage phone calls for" Issue

I have been seeing some unusual behavior that seems to come from a previous installation of Remote Call Control software.

Basically, several users have been seeing the group named “People I manage phone calls for” in their Lync client. The people listed were former managers and they were formerly administrative assistants or had some other role that required delegation in Outlook for email.

It appears that these delegation settings have made their way to Lync 2010 before the delegation replication was disabled by using Set-CsClientPolicy –EnableExchangeDelegateSync $False

After lots of research, all I have been able to find is that the SEFAUtil.exe application can possibly provide some help. This application is part of the Resource Kit for Lync Server 2010. So, being a basic systems admin, I did what all of us do, I just tried to run it. Of course, it didn’t work. If I read the documentation, it would have been clearer to me that there are several steps involved in using this application, and there are a couple of other strange behaviors.

Configuring SEFAUtil for use involves some work.

1. The server used MUST be a part of a trusted application pool. There is no other way around this requirement. You can either stand up a new server and add it to the trusted application pool, or add your current Lync pool to the trusted application pool.

New-CsTrustedApplicationPool -id pool01.infrastructurehelp.com -Registrar pool01.infrastructurehelp.com -site Site:Primary

  1. Then you need to add the SEFAUtil.exe  application as a trusted application.

New-CsTrustedApplication -ApplicationId SEFAUtil -TrustedApplicationPoolFqdn pool01.infrastructurehelp.com –Port 7489

3. After that is done, you need to copy the change for the topology to the Lync environment.

Enable-CsTopology

4. Next, you need to run the application from the proper folder, which is really pretty standard as it will not be listed in the path statement.

Change the directory to C:\ \Program Files\Microsoft Lync Server 2013\Reskit.

FINALLY, you get to run the SEFAUtil.exe. Of course, it is really an odd beast in that it is strangely case sensitive. For example:

C:\Program Files\Microsoft Lync Server 2010\ResKit>SEFAUtil.exe /server:pool01.infrastructurehelp.com russ.kaufmann@infrastructurehelp.com

User Aor: sip:Russ.Kaufmann@infrastructurehelp.com

Display Name: Kaufmann, Russ

UM Enabled: False

Simulring enabled: False

CallForwarding Enabled: false

Running the command seems to work fine in that it did identify my account, properly. So, the above worked fine. The next step is to try to remove the delegate, so we run this command and get this output.

C:\Program Files\Microsoft Lync Server 2010\ResKit>SEFAUtil.exe /server:pool01.infrastructurehelp.com russ.kaufmann@infrastructurehelp.com /removedelegate: mother.goose@infrastructurehelp.com

User Aor: sip: Russ.Kaufmann@infrastructurehelp.com

Display Name: Kaufmann, Russ

UM Enabled: False

Simulring enabled: False

Simultaneously Ringing Delegates: sip: mother.goose@infrastructurehelp.com

It didn’t remove Mother Goose. Running it again, and using the /RemoveDelegate switch, didn’t do anything. My delegate was still there as shown below. However, if I use the same case as in the results for a Get-CsUser russ.kaufmann@infrastructurehelp.com, which is Russ.Kaufmann@Infrastructurehelp.com., it still won’t work. It doesn’t like the caps for the SIP domain. So, I went with the caps for my name and the non-caps for the SIP domain, and it worked.

C:\Program Files\Microsoft Lync Server 2010\ResKit>SEFAUtil.exe /server:pool01.infrastructurehelp.com Russ.Kaufmann@infrastructurehelp.com /removedelegate: Mother.Goose@infrastructurehelp.com

User Aor: sip: russ.kaufmann@infrastructurehelp.com

Display Name: Kaufmann, Russ

UM Enabled: False

Simulring enabled: False

The above worked. Not only was it painful to configure the application so you can actually run it, once you run the application, it has its own quirks.

Advertisements
This entry was posted in Lync. Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s